Make Sure to Schedule Backflow Preventer Maintenance

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

Imagine that you’re outside washing your car with a hose that is submerged in a bucket of soapy water. Now imagine that your plumbing system has suddenly become compromised. Perhaps the main water line has burst and there is a sudden drop in your water pressure. You water supply is kept pressurized, but a sudden drop in pressure could cause the flow to reverse, siphoning up any nearby source of water through the pipes. This reverse flow may suck up the soapy water inside of the bucket and bring it into your home, causing it to flow through your plumbing system and into your home’s drinking water.

This is called backflow and, while the given scenario is unlikely, many areas of your plumbing system run the risk of cross-connecting in the event of a sudden change in pressure. Backflow occurs when the flow of water reverses and any contaminant—liquid, gas, or solid—runs the risk of entering your water supply. However, this risk is prevented with a backflow prevention device.

A backflow preventer is a device that provides an air gap so that back siphonage cannot occur. Many plumbing systems already have a backflow device installed, and state and local codes mandate the use of backflow preventers in many cases. This is because a backflow prevention device is a safety measure, keeping harmful contaminants from reaching the potable drinking supply and causing unsafe conditions in your home from the addition of sewage, wastewater, or untreated groundwater in your home.

If you already own a backflow prevention device for your plumbing system, you may believe that you are protected. However, many municipalities require that your backflow device is inspected and tested on a regular basis by a trained technician. A plumber can make sure that your backflow prevention device continues to work as it should. Your backflow preventer contains test cocks and shut-off valves designed specifically for the purpose of maintenance.

Keep your home and family safe by calling a plumber to test your backflow preventer every year, perhaps alongside your annual plumbing maintenance visit. Call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) to schedule backflow prevention maintenance in Longwood today!

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Warning Signs That It’s Time for Drain Cleaning

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

Drains are the unsung heroes of your water system. They provide a clear route of egress for sink, shower, and dishwasher water, allowing the appliances that you use every day to keep running smoothly. Like all things, however, your drainage system needs regular care to stave off eventual decline and breakdown. How can you tell that it’s time to have your drainage system cleaned? Read on to find out.

Slow Drainage

Because of the nature of drain blockages, chances are there will be a slow buildup before the drain is completely plugged. If you notice that one of your drains is draining more and more slowly, it is a good sign that the drain is becoming clogged. If this happens, don’t wait for it to become completely clogged! Call a plumber before the problem gets worse.

Bad Smells

One of the most common signs of drainage problems is the presence of horrible smells coming from your drain. In some cases, like the garbage disposal, this may be a temporary result of food or other waste being flushed down. If the smell is persistent, however, you likely have a part of your drainage system backing up. This will need to be addressed by a professional.

Backflow

One of the worst results of a clogged drain system is backflow of dirty water. This most commonly happens when you do something like turn on the dishwasher, causing water from the sewage line to bubble up in your sink. This kind of backflow is an indication of a serious clog in your drainage system, and should be addressed as soon as possible. If you see this happening, call a plumber immediately. If left unchecked, this issue can cause serious damage not only to your drainage system, but to other areas of your house as well.

A lot of drain issues start small and get progressively worse. Even if it seems trivial, don’t take a chance by ignoring your drain when it is acting strange. If you are experiencing any sort of problem with the drains in your house, call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) to schedule an appointment. We provide quality drain cleaning services throughout Casselberry, FL.

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Water Heater Repair Question: Is It the Dip Tube?

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

The storage tank water heater is a fascinating home convenience because its simple design does so much for your home. A storage tank water is able to effectively and efficiently deliver hot water to any tap in your home multiple times throughout the day without requiring very much maintenance or many repairs. This is because it relies on the heat rising principle to provide hot water, rather than any complex mechanical parts.

However, your water heater may require repair eventually, and one of the parts that is most likely to break at some point is the dip tube. Luckily, replacing a broken dip tube is usually a simple repair for a trained technician with the right tools and expertise. This post explains more about this important component and the problems it may run into.

The Importance of the Dip Tube

When water reaches your home, it is usually fairly cool depending on the outdoor temperature. When a hot water tap is turned on, it flows from the water heater, which keeps water heated at all times. Water comes into the tank from a pipe at the top, which leads into the dip tube.

The dip tube is a pipe made of plastic that leads directly to the bottom of the tank. Beneath the tank is a burner, or else there are electric heating elements on the side of the tank towards the bottom. Hot water naturally rises above cold water, so a tube at the top of the tank directs heated water into the pipes that lead to your faucets.

Common Dip Tube Repairs

Because the dip tube is made of plastic, it may crack or break apart at some point. A small crack in the tube will cause some cold water to mix with the hot water, which may mean your water may only feel warm. Or if it breaks off entirely, you may get sudden bursts of cold water or barely any heating at all. Generally, a technician will simply need to replace the tube.

Don’t wait to call a plumber when you notice reduced heating. You use your water heater for the most important daily tasks, from taking hot showers to cleaning dishes, which is why you should call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) at the first sign of problems. For prompt water heater repair in Sanford, call now!

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Different Materials Used for Pipe Replacement

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

For many decades, the two most common materials for indoor plumbing were iron and galvanized steel. The latter continued to be used until the early 1970s. Although both metals are sturdy, they are also inclined toward corrosion over time, which eventually leads to water contamination, leaks, and busted pipes. For homes built before 1970, it is often necessary to schedule pipe replacement to swap out these outdated materials for modern ones.

There are a number of different materials that plumbers use when repiping parts of a home. Which ones depend on the situation. If you hire the professionals at Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) to handle your pipe replacement in Apopka, FL or the surrounding areas, you’ll receive the skilled work necessary to select the right new pipes and install them so you will have many decades of trouble-free plumbing.

The Most Common Types of Pipe Replacement Material

  • Copper: This is the metal that superseded iron and galvanized steel as the new standard for plumbing. Copper is durable, corrosion-resistant, and extremely light, making it easy to work with. Copper also has greater flexibility than steel and iron, making it less likely to break when encountering extra force or strung between two distant supports. In general, copper will outlast most other piping material.
  • PEX: One of the most popular of the different types of plastic pipes used in plumbing, PEX stands for cross-linked polyethylene. It is especially common for freshwater pipes that carry drinking water to taps. PEX is less expensive than copper, does not suffer from corrosion or pinhole leaking (which is sometimes an issue with copper), and can often last for 50 years.
  • CPVC: An advance over standard PVC pipes, some plumbers prefer CPVC (chlorinated polyvinyl chloride) over PEX piping. These pipes are most commonly used for hot water lines because they have a high resistance to heat.

When handling pipe replacement for a home, a plumber will probably use a combination of these materials to complete the job. Normally, copper pipes are used for main lines, and various color-coded plastic pipes (red for hot, blue for cold) branching off to fixtures. Using these flexible materials, plumbers have greater freedom for designing plumbing than they once did, which is a reason that it’s always a good idea to have pipe replacement done during a remodeling, since it permits more options.

If you have a home with aging pipes, or if you have started to notice signs of declining pipes, call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) for professional pipe replacement in Apopka, FL. We will bring the best technology and skills to any job we do.

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Why You Need Professionals to Install Backflow Preventers

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

To protect your home’s supply of fresh water, you need to make certain that contamination from the wastewater system doesn’t flow back up the pipes (backflow) and into the freshwater pipes. The device that prevents this from occurring when there is a change of pressure that lowers the water pressure on the freshwater side is called a backflow preventer. Many Central Florida municipalities legally require homes to have backflow preventers for sanitation and health reasons—so the chances are high that your plumbing system already has one installed.

Backflow preventers can fail, however, and they need to have annual inspections from licensed plumbers to see that they are still working properly. If you find out that your backflow preventer is no longer adequately shielding your fresh water supply, you must contact professional certified plumbers to install a new one as soon as possible.

To reach expert plumbers with the experience necessary for installing and inspecting backflow prevention in Winter Park, FL, call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI). We also have 24-hour service in case of emergencies.

Licensed Plumbers Are Necessary for This Installation

Backflow prevention isn’t a matter of convenience: it’s one of safety. For this reason, you must only entrust the work to licensed professionals. A certified plumber will make certain that the right size of backflow preventer is installed into your plumbing and that it seals correctly so there is no danger of allowing sewage into your freshwater lines. You do not want to risk the safety of your family by attempting to install it on your own, or by hiring a non-certified amateur.

Also keep in mind that in the majority of Central Florida municipalities, non-licensed work on a backflow preventer is illegal. Any backflow preventer that receives low-quality installation from a non-professional will likely fail its next annual inspection. When a backflow preventer fails this test, it must receive immediate replacement. You will save time and money by making certain that you have the work done by licensed plumbers the first time.

Call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) for Backflow Preventer Installation

Our licensed plumbing team is experienced with numerous types of repairs and installations. We specialize in professional backflow prevention services in Winter Park, FL and the rest of Central Florida. We can handle the inspections, repairs, maintenance, and installations you need. Call us any time and we can answer all your questions regarding backflow prevention.

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