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Monday, April 10th, 2017

plumbing-pipesAlmost any business relies on indoor plumbing, making regular plumbing service essential for successful operation. Food service companies have even higher plumbing needs, and poor plumbing upkeep can lead to a business shutting down because of code violations.

Although you can always depend on our commercial plumbers for fast repairs for your business—leak detection, booster pump fixes, sump pump replacements—we strongly recommend you arrange for regular commercial plumbing maintenance through one of our customized maintenance agreements. Below are two of the critical services (among many) that come with routine plumbing maintenance for your business.

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Why Does My Commercial Property Need Backflow Prevention?

Monday, December 19th, 2016

If you own a business, chances are high that you have a backflow prevention device already in place. This is usually a municipal requirement. The backflow preventer must have annual inspection from a certified technician, which is a service that we are glad to provide. In addition, we offer repair, maintenance, and new installation services for commercial backflow preventers.

If you’ve wondered why having backflow prevention is so important, we’d like to address that in this post.

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What You Need to Know about Backflow Prevention

Monday, July 13th, 2015

Backflow prevention is a necessary part of both residential and commercial plumbing systems. The purpose of a backflow preventer is to stop the bacteria and other contaminants in the wastewater side of the plumbing system from entering into the freshwater side and polluting it. A backflow prevention device makes certain that sewage can only flow one way through the plumbing system; a valve closes to prevent wastewater from rising the wrong direction when there is a change in pressure from either the freshwater or wastewater sides.

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How Backflow Prevention Protects You

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

Most homeowners take for granted the fact that there is always reliable clean drinking water available in the home. You probably assume that clean water will flow from the faucet every time you turn it on, as your water supply goes through a very thorough municipal water supply treatment process before it reaches your home. But a plumbing system is so complex that the potential for backflow is unfortunately often present.

Protect your water supply by installing a backflow preventer at any potential cross connections, which we’ll go over in today’s guide, and keeping it maintained and tested by professionals. Call the experts at Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) for quality service from a certified plumber.

What Is Backflow Prevention?

Backflow prevention devices keep backflow from contaminating your water supply. Backflow occurs when there is a pressure imbalance somewhere in your plumbing system, which allows for the possibility of backsiphonage or back pressure. In either case, a source of cross contamination is introduced into the plumbing system, and there is a possibility that chemicals or wastewater may enter your plumbing system if the pressure in the water supply were to change.

A sudden drop in water pressure can occur for many reasons. Perhaps there was a break in the water main, or firefighters had to access a hydrant that drew from the supply. Other liquids may become drawn into the pipes, especially if a cross connection exists. And sometimes this backflow is hazardous.

Let’s say you put a hose into a bucket of soapy water. If the pressure in the water supply dropped, the soapy water could become sucked back into the water supply. This becomes far more dangerous when the cross contamination is a chemical or if dirty wastewater enters the potable supply. One example is if you have a boiler in the home. Boiler feedwater may contain chemicals unsafe for human consumption, which is why connections between boilers and the water supply are usually fitted with a backflow prevention device.

A backflow prevention device contains a one way valve in which water can only flow in one direction. Federal, state, and local codes require that you have a backflow prevention device installed at any potential source of a cross connection. While your municipality mandates the use of backflow preventers in many cases, it’s up to you to make sure it’s in good shape.

Call the technicians at Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) for regular testing and maintenance of your backflow prevention device in Longwood to help keep your family safe from contamination.

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Reasons Backflow Issues May Occur in Your Home

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

The name pretty much says it all: “backflow”. Without having a full definition in front of you, you can probably guess that backflow isn’t a good thing for you or your plumbing, and it’s not. Your home’s plumbing is set-up so that wastewater stays very separate from your potable water. When backflow appears, a problem has developed whereby the wastewater is somehow backing up in your plumbing and entering your supply pipes, i.e., your potable water. There are ways to help prevent backflow, and these days most plumbing requires some kind of backflow prevention service for your property. But there are a few ways in which backflow can occur, and we’ll outline some of these below.

Backflow Isn’t a Clog

One thing to be clear about when it comes to backflow is that it isn’t caused by a clog in the system; clogs stop wastewater from exiting while backflow is the mixture of wastewater with your potable water. Here are a couple of ways backflow can occur:

  • Problems with pressure in the system – your plumbing system works on a delicate balance of pressure; should this pressure become imbalanced on either the supply side or the outgoing wastewater side, backflow can develop. There are two kinds of backflow problems that can occur because of pressure: backflow, which is categorized by downstream pressure that overpowers the upstream pressure and backsiphonage, which develops from negative pressure, which has something of a vacuum effect on your plumbing system.
  • Backflow preventer breaks – plumbing systems have been required for some time to have devices called backflow preventers. These devices prevent any kind of wastewater from backflowing into your potable water. If a backflow preventer is poorly installed, or it develops a leak, the device can malfunction and allow wastewater into your system.

Backflow in your water is a potentially dangerous situation. If you suspect you may have a backflow problem, call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. today and schedule an appointment for plumbing repair with one of our specialists in Lake Mary, FL.

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How Commercial Backflow Prevention Services Benefit Your Business

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

The people on your commercial property trust your commercial plumbing system to be just as safe and reliable as the one they use at home. Whether employees are washing their hands in the break room or kitchen staff members pour a glass of water for a guest, they expect that the water is clean and healthy. One real risk that many commercial property owners and managers don’t often consider is that a plumbing system that is not maintained may risk the chances of backflow. Backflow prevention devices are put in place in most plumbing systems to keep unwanted sewage or other sources of cross contamination out of the water supply, but they need frequent maintenance to do so.

If you need a backflow prevention device in Sanford for your commercial property, or if you need it tested to ensure continued quality, call the experts at Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI).

How Backflow Prevention Works

Backflow is defined is the undesirable flow of waste into the potable water supply in case of a pressure change in the plumbing. Your water supply is kept pressurized so that it can easily flow from the faucets and fixtures in the home. Your drainage system, on the other hand, relies on gravity to move wastewater along the pipes. If the pressure were to change in one of these areas, cross contamination could occur via back-pressure (when the water supply pressure is increased) or back-siphonage (when the water supply pressure is decreased). This may be due to a water main breach or a number of other issues. Backflow prevention devices usually use an air gap and a series of check valves to prevent this from happening—but they need regular testing and maintenance to work properly.

Professionals Only: Safety Is Key

You should only have professionals service your plumbing system to ensure the absolute safety of everyone in the building. They know what to look for when making sure the parts have not worn down and are still just as capable of protecting your plumbing.

Call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) to learn more about commercial backflow prevention in Sanford. We offer quality maintenance, repair, and installation for all of your plumbing components.

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Make Sure to Schedule Backflow Preventer Maintenance

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

Imagine that you’re outside washing your car with a hose that is submerged in a bucket of soapy water. Now imagine that your plumbing system has suddenly become compromised. Perhaps the main water line has burst and there is a sudden drop in your water pressure. You water supply is kept pressurized, but a sudden drop in pressure could cause the flow to reverse, siphoning up any nearby source of water through the pipes. This reverse flow may suck up the soapy water inside of the bucket and bring it into your home, causing it to flow through your plumbing system and into your home’s drinking water.

This is called backflow and, while the given scenario is unlikely, many areas of your plumbing system run the risk of cross-connecting in the event of a sudden change in pressure. Backflow occurs when the flow of water reverses and any contaminant—liquid, gas, or solid—runs the risk of entering your water supply. However, this risk is prevented with a backflow prevention device.

A backflow preventer is a device that provides an air gap so that back siphonage cannot occur. Many plumbing systems already have a backflow device installed, and state and local codes mandate the use of backflow preventers in many cases. This is because a backflow prevention device is a safety measure, keeping harmful contaminants from reaching the potable drinking supply and causing unsafe conditions in your home from the addition of sewage, wastewater, or untreated groundwater in your home.

If you already own a backflow prevention device for your plumbing system, you may believe that you are protected. However, many municipalities require that your backflow device is inspected and tested on a regular basis by a trained technician. A plumber can make sure that your backflow prevention device continues to work as it should. Your backflow preventer contains test cocks and shut-off valves designed specifically for the purpose of maintenance.

Keep your home and family safe by calling a plumber to test your backflow preventer every year, perhaps alongside your annual plumbing maintenance visit. Call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) to schedule backflow prevention maintenance in Longwood today!

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Why You Need Professionals to Install Backflow Preventers

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

To protect your home’s supply of fresh water, you need to make certain that contamination from the wastewater system doesn’t flow back up the pipes (backflow) and into the freshwater pipes. The device that prevents this from occurring when there is a change of pressure that lowers the water pressure on the freshwater side is called a backflow preventer. Many Central Florida municipalities legally require homes to have backflow preventers for sanitation and health reasons—so the chances are high that your plumbing system already has one installed.

Backflow preventers can fail, however, and they need to have annual inspections from licensed plumbers to see that they are still working properly. If you find out that your backflow preventer is no longer adequately shielding your fresh water supply, you must contact professional certified plumbers to install a new one as soon as possible.

To reach expert plumbers with the experience necessary for installing and inspecting backflow prevention in Winter Park, FL, call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI). We also have 24-hour service in case of emergencies.

Licensed Plumbers Are Necessary for This Installation

Backflow prevention isn’t a matter of convenience: it’s one of safety. For this reason, you must only entrust the work to licensed professionals. A certified plumber will make certain that the right size of backflow preventer is installed into your plumbing and that it seals correctly so there is no danger of allowing sewage into your freshwater lines. You do not want to risk the safety of your family by attempting to install it on your own, or by hiring a non-certified amateur.

Also keep in mind that in the majority of Central Florida municipalities, non-licensed work on a backflow preventer is illegal. Any backflow preventer that receives low-quality installation from a non-professional will likely fail its next annual inspection. When a backflow preventer fails this test, it must receive immediate replacement. You will save time and money by making certain that you have the work done by licensed plumbers the first time.

Call Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) for Backflow Preventer Installation

Our licensed plumbing team is experienced with numerous types of repairs and installations. We specialize in professional backflow prevention services in Winter Park, FL and the rest of Central Florida. We can handle the inspections, repairs, maintenance, and installations you need. Call us any time and we can answer all your questions regarding backflow prevention.

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How Backflow Preventers Protect Your Water Supply

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

When you turn on a tap in your home, you should see the clear, clean water you rely on for cooking, showering, or cleaning. Access to clean water is expected by most homeowners in Apopka, so we tend not to think much about the quality of our water when we turn on a faucet. However, it’s important to know that your water supply may be at risk for contamination at any time, particularly if a backflow prevention device is not in place or is not tested regularly.

Your water supply is kept at a high pressure so that water can easily flow out of any tap in your home. The sewage system, however, is not pressurized, relying instead on gravity to remove waste from the home. If anything happens to increase the pressure of the exit drain or to decrease the pressure of the water supply, backflow may occur.

Backflow can be defined as the unwanted reversal of flow causing non-potable, or unsafe, water and other substances to enter the water supply. Backflow occurs when the pressure of the non-potable system is higher than the pressure of the potable water. This may happen for any number of reasons including a breach in the mater main or a sewer line blockage.

The best way to protect your water supply from contamination is with a backflow prevention device. Backflow preventers provide an air gap or physical barriers that prevent wastewater from polluting the freshwater. Although there are multiple types of backflow preventers, they generally prevent backflow with check valves that only allow the wastewater to flow in one direction.

Many homes already have backflow prevention devices installed, but these should be tested regularly to check for worn out parts and to prevent sudden failure. Any source of contamination puts your health at risk, so you should allow a plumbing professional to inspect and test this portion of your system during an annual plumbing maintenance visit.

Don’t put the quality of your water supply at risk. For maintenance, questions, or to install a backflow prevention device in Apopka, call on the professionals at Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI).

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Why You Need Backflow Prevention in Longwood, FL

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

When you turn on a tap in your house, you expect to see clear, clean water come from the faucet. The idea that the wastewater in your sewage system might contaminate this freshwater is awful thought…but it’s something that could occur without the protection of a backflow preventer on the plumbing for your home.

Your home may or may not already have backflow prevention on its plumbing. If you are unsure, contact a professional plumber. The plumber can recommend that right installation of a backflow preventer if you don’t have one. If you already have one, the plumber will perform tests on it to see if it needs repair work. Keep in mind that not all plumbing contractors are certified in backflow prevention and repair, so make certain that you a company like Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI) that has a staff with the right certification for backflow prevention in Longwood, FL.

The Importance of Backflow Prevention

The fresh water that comes into your home through the municipal system is pressurized; that way, when you open up a tap, the water immediately comes out. The sewage system, on the other hand, relies on gravity and ventilation to remove wastewater from your home. If the pressure should change on either side—loss of pressure for the fresh water, increase in pressure for the wastewater—it will result in sewage pushing up the wrong direction and forcing into the firewater pipes.

This imbalance can occur for a number of reasons. Loss of water pressure can occur because of problems in the municipal water supply or due to an abrupt drain due to a water main breach. The influx of wastewater due to the drop in pressure on the supply side is known as back siphonage. The reverse can occur because of sewer line blockage or sewer system issues, and the result is known as backpressure.

In either case, you can have seriously contaminated drinking, bathing, and cooking water, leading to major health troubles. A backflow preventer placed onto the plumbing uses a check valve to stop the wastewater from entering into the freshwater. The valve permits the wastewater in the sewage lines to move only one direction.

A backflow preventer must be professionally installed to make sure that it fits your plumbing needs. It also requires regular maintenance, which you can have done as part of annual plumbing maintenance, to make certain the important mechanical parts are not wearing down and allowing wastewater to move two directions.

To find certified inspectors for backflow prevention or other plumbing services in Longwood, FL, call on Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. (MPI). Since 1975, we’ve helped central Florida homes keep their water clean and their plumbing healthy.

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