Does Corrosion Mean the End of the Line for My Water Heater?

Monday, July 31st, 2017

Orlando-Water -eaterCorrosion is metal’s biggest enemy, and it’s fair to say that nobody wants any appliance they own to suffer from the weakening effects of corrosion. It’s one that especially applies to water heaters, which combine metal, water, and oxygen—the perfect mixture to start the chemical reaction that leads to corrosion.

Fortunately for your water heater, it was designed with the dangers of rust and other forms of corrosion in mind. It has a number of safety designs to keep rust away: the inside of the tank is lined with glass; an overfill tank creates an air cushion for the water pressure without actually allowing oxygen into the tank; and a special device called an anode rod that runs from the top the bottom of the tank attracts corrosion to it so that it rather than the tank corrodes.

However, corrosion still can’t be prevented 100%. Your water heater may at some point start to show signs of corrosion. If this occurs, is it automatically time to replace the water heater?

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Clogs around the House and Other Signs You Have a Broken Sewer Line

Monday, July 17th, 2017

interior-of-pipelineThe sewer line is a part of your home’s plumbing that thankfully does its job far from sight. But because it’s hidden in the ground, it’s tricky to tell when the sewer line first develops breaks. Since you want to have a broken sewer line repaired (or in some cases replaced) as soon as possible before the break turns into a larger, more expensive problem—one that can create extreme unpleasantness in your home—you have to keep a watch for early warning signs that something is wrong.

Here are a few indications that you have breaks in your sewer line that require sewer repair services:

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How Water Softeners Work

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

question-mark-badgeWhen you call on our water treatment professionals for water testing services, one of the issues we’ll look for in your home’s water is the presence of “hardness.” Hard water is water that has a high amount of magnesium and calcium suspended in it. This isn’t harmful to drink, but it’s extremely damaging to residential plumbing. The magnesium and calcium leave limescale deposits along pipes and fixtures, leading to clogging and leaking, and also causes major damage to appliances like water heaters. Hard water also makes it more difficult to work up soap lather and it leaves filmy deposits on household surfaces, skin, and hair.

Hard water is unfortunately common in household plumbing. Magnesium and calcium can enter freshwater pipes through ground water seepage. It’s estimated that 85% of homes in the U.S. have hard water. Unfortunately, Florida is one of the states where hard water is at its worst, with more than 15 grains of hard water minerals per gallon.

Thankfully, eliminating hard water is easy for professionals. All we have to do is install a whole-house water softener, one of the various water treatment systems we install in Orlando, FL and the surrounding areas.

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